Mayhem 2012 at Klipsch – The finale

Posted on November 11, 2013

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Mayhem at Klipsch – The finale

Slipknot headlines Mayhem Festival 2012 at Klipsch Music Center in Noblesville, Ind. on Sunday, July 18, 2012. (Photo by Rachael Mattice/Journal & Courier)

Slipknot headlines Mayhem Festival 2012 at Klipsch Music Center in Noblesville, Ind. on Sunday, July 18, 2012. (Photo by Rachael Mattice/Journal & Courier)

By Rachael Mattice
Half of the pavilion put up their horns with shouts barely raising sound level meters, when a roar equivalent to the engine revving of a thousand 86’ Buick Grand Nationals should have transpired when Lemmy Kilmister, vocalist for Motorhead, spoke to them.

“That is not how we do it, we do it with the agony of our esophagus tearing out of our throat,” yelled Lemmy when the audience unenthusiastically clapped after a song.

From the fans’ response at Klipsch Music Center to Lemmy’s shoutout, the Mayhem 2012 fans did not appear stoked that the biggest band to start metal and rock n’ roll was performing in front of them with the most badass, lethal musician busting out sleazy riffs like Motorhead hadn’t aged a day.

How can you even like rock n’ roll if you don’t like Motorhead?! This was my thought process as I stared angrily at the crowd.

“A crowd at a metal show being non-receptive to Motorhead should be punishable by law,” said TJ Maxfield, another fan of Motorhead.

Not only has Motorhead influenced so many bands since the start of their existence, but they influenced my music taste and served a connection with a specific sound that only comes along with a few bands in an individual’s lifetime.

Half way through Motorhead’s set, I left to do something else I had waited a long time to interview more reputable metal star names in the industry.

Sitting eye-to-eye with a guitarist I just saw perform two hours before to thousands of people, I shook the hand of Anthrax guitarist Rob Caggiano to commence my second interview with the band.

Once my time was up, I replayed my audio and listened to the other interview of the day, another guitarist from a notable, yet newer death metal band called Whitechapel. Also a follow up interview from a first discussion I had with vocalist Phil Bozeman a month earlier, I met with Alex Wade in the press tent to talk more about Mayhem, their self-titled recently released album and the set they crushed through two hours prior.

Both bands that I interviewed in person actually put on spectacular performances in 90-degree heat and riled up cattle-packed crowds in late afternoon as if it were a private showdown in a venue they were both headlining.

After the festival takeovers of Whitechapel, Anthrax and then Motorhead, Slayer was the next to conquer the grounds.

Slayer performs at Mayhem Festival at Klipsch Music Center in Noblesville, Ind. on Sunday, July 18, 2012. (Photo by Rachael Mattice/Journal & Courier)

Slayer performs at Mayhem Festival at Klipsch Music Center in Noblesville, Ind. on Sunday, July 18, 2012. (Photo by Rachael Mattice/Journal & Courier)

Standing feet away from Tom Araya, Kerry King and Dave Lombardo, I could take in what true metal is from each of the senses. Slayer, like Motorhead, played their songs as if they were recently released.

There were a few moments (also that I was able to capture with my camera) when Slayer stood silent and didn’t move. Araya malevolently smirked at the audience. A look like that, with those eyes, only prompts thoughts of what he was thinking about.

Is it nostalgia, taking in the moments of glory? Eyeing up the meat they are about to devour? Counting how many people will be trapped if they burn the joint down with their inverted cross speaker props?

Once King proved to be one of the most intense metal dudes on the planet by flicking his pick to the audience as if his fingers were burning hot from guitar shredding, Slipknot was on next. Slipknot, after much debate with logical reasoning, was the headline act at Mayhem for reasons unknown to me, and opened with red backlighting that matched their red Michael Myer’s greaser suits.

However, Slipknot proved to do the headliner’s job – owning up to be the fan favorite. It only took seconds to send a wave of energy across sea of masses. They will always be placed in my mind with gratitude for giving me the opportunity to be one of ten photographers and journalists allowed to photograph the eightpiece band.

Still proving to be the biggest metal outdoor festival tour of the time, Mayhem successfully brought together a killer set of acts for all hellions to enjoy. One time every year, one day when our society comes together to enjoy “that headache music.”

Mattice is a producer and music journalist for the Journal & Courier. She can be reached on Twitter @RachaelM_JC.

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Posted in: 2012